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I’ve written, rehearsed, I’ve edited and rehearsed some more and have now completed my final speech and essay for Speech class to end this semester with a bang. I was told that my speech deliverance had improved tenfold and my speaking was clear and not muffled or so soft as usual with a trembling body. I felt quite proud. And so, without further adieu my essay and speech. -The speech is supposed to resemble bits of the essay-

Final Essay:

Group Communications (Persuasive Speech)

            Election Day is over, yet after every election, we are chided for our poor turnout. We’re reminded by the scolding pundits that we are supposed to be the greatest democracy in the world, yet so many of us (specifically the age group of 18-24) don’t bother to exercise democracy’s greatest right! You hear various excuses; “I can’t, have too much work and no break”, etc. Though I’m not someone to sit in judgment of people with legitimate excuses; I do have two suggestions/solutions that might just help those non-voters have a change in mind about voting in the next Election Day.

Statistically studied by the Census Bureau’s Current Population Survey (CPS) November Voting and Registration Supplements, the voter turnout from young and old voters has indubitably had an impact in the outcomes of elections, but the age group most surveyed as non-voters are of 18-24 years of age. They believe that their votes do not count and that they do not have a voice. I believe otherwise; it is just their choice to stay ignorant or apathetic towards voting that they see/believe this trend. But come Election Day, those setting up the polls and readying the public for this event could do better.

Though, it isn’t as simple as just pulling a rabbit out of magician’s hat you know. To gain the attention of that age group (audience) you must appeal to their interest or in the least make such an important day meaningful or enlightening. This of course, is where my suggestions come into play to help solve the issue and get these non-voters interested in voting. Come Election Day everyone is up to their elbows in nothing but questions, fear, or even doubt about who will win; what will prosper or who will lead this grand nation to a better if not less stress induced future.  Among all that worry, if it is such a grand day, then why not make it grand and have importance for the time being?

Why not make or treat it as a national holiday?! It would make the day feel more special to everyone. Plus, let’s say students, teachers and administrators did not have to go to school on that day. But of course, those adults who worked in schools would have no excuse for not voting. I propose that all major Election Days be paid national holidays. If not that, then perhaps treat it with at least the same importance that we treat President’s Day- an artificial holiday that many people can’t explain why we celebrate or when it is.

That’s already engaging as it is and shows importance to those who have an apathetic emotion towards something that affects their lives. One solution, I can happily say, that would most certainly gain attention of an audience. Though it seems as it would do the trick, there’s but one other solution I have that I certainly think, to be a crowd pleaser and have them gathering at the poll booths.

Familiar with those inexpensive cameras people have at the top of their computers so they can show relatives pictures of something in their lives or chat with friends? Why not make one of those cameras for/place them in each voting booth. The voter would have the option of turning the camera on or off. Those who decide to put it on would have two/four minutes to express their feelings about the election, the candidates or anything else they want to talk about.

The videos would be shown on public access TV and/or the Internet. So if some people are not excited about voting because of the choices offered, they could go to the polls primarily to express this dissatisfaction and, while they’re there, they might as well vote. If voting is an event that allows you to share your opinion and get your message across, then why not make it so and in a way that involves the audience to become engaged in it. When the non-voting population is engaged, it makes the event more intriguing and has many get involved (which is where their voice makes such a difference).

Doing just that is what I believe would help gain the non-voters interested in voting or at least have them become aware that they can express their opinions about the elections. It shows that their voice does matter and that their vote is important in more ways than one. And those excuses that many say about what they have to do and how little time they have to put effort in attending the Election Day will be all the more curious if these solutions are offered. Wouldn’t you be willing to take two minutes of your time to have a chance to express your thoughts on what should or shouldn’t be done? I believe many would jump at the chance to do so.

Chided for our poor turnouts and reminded by scolding pundits of how we’re to be the greatest democracy in the world, yet populated with many who do not bother to exercise democracy’s greatest right is more than enough. The excuses should fly out the window and, those with legitimate excuses; I’d not sit in judgment of them. But engaging these non-voters with perhaps making Election Day a paid national holiday or offering them the chance to express their opinions through a video at the polls; I believe would have a great turnout towards an important event in history that affects our lives.

Speech:

(Persuasive Speech)

How do you feel about getting your voice across in a crowd? What if it’s a great opinion, yet you think it won’t make a difference? What if you’re trying to make something legal, or have an important law/amendment you saw fit, pass? That is where your vote comes in handy, it is your voice. Yet we’re reminded by the scolding pundits that we are supposed to be the greatest democracy in the world, but so many of us don’t bother to exercise democracy’s greatest right! Though I’m not someone to sit in judgment of people who have legitimate excuses; I have two suggestions/solutions that might just help those non-voters have a change in mind about voting in the next Election Day.

Statistically studied by the Census Bureau’s (CPS) November Voting and Registration Supplements, the voter turnout from young and old voters has indubitably had an impact in the outcomes of elections, but the age group most surveyed as non-voters are of 18-24 years of age. They believe that their votes do not count and that they do not have a voice. I believe otherwise; it’s just their choice to stay ignorant or apathetic towards voting that they see/believe this trend.

If your vote is your voice, think of how many things you’re capable of accomplishing? With just one vote, you’ve already set a trend in supporting something you believe in and with that it gives an opening for someone else to vote as well because you’ve given them that strength. Though, it isn’t as simple as just pulling a rabbit out of magician’s hat you know. To gain the attention of that group (audience) you must appeal to their interest or in the least make such an important day meaningful or enlightening.

Come Election Day everyone is up to their elbows in nothing but questions, fear and doubt about who will win and lead this grand nation to a better if not less stress induced future. Why not make or treat it as a national holiday?! It would make the day feel more special to everyone. Plus, let’s say students, teachers and administrators did not have to go to school on that day. But of course, those adults who worked in schools would have no excuse for not voting. I propose that all major Election Days be paid national holidays. If not that, then perhaps treat it with at least the same importance we treat President’s Day.

Though it seems as it would do the trick, there’s but one other solution I believe to be a crowd pleaser. Familiar with those inexpensive cameras people have at the top of their computers? Why not make one of those cameras for/place them in each voting booth. The voter would have the option of turning the camera on or off. Those who decide to put it on would have two minutes to express their feelings about the election, the candidates or anything else they want to talk about.

The videos would be shown on public access TV and/or the Internet. So if some people are not excited about voting because of the choices offered, they could go to the polls primarily to express this dissatisfaction and, while they’re there, they might as well vote. Doing just that is what I believe would help gain the non-voters interest in voting and become aware that they can express their opinions about the elections. It shows that their voice does matter and that their vote is important. Wouldn’t you be willing to take two minutes of your time to have a chance to express your thoughts on what should or shouldn’t be done? I believe many would jump at the chance to do so.

Reminded by scolding pundits of how we’re to be the greatest democracy in the world, yet populated with many who do not bother to exercise democracy’s greatest right is more than enough. The excuses should fly out the window and, those with legitimate excuses; I’d not sit in judgment of them. But engaging these non-voters with perhaps making Election Day a paid national holiday or offering them the chance to express their opinions through video at the polls; I believe would have a great turnout towards an important event in history that affects our lives.

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